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Hello and welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast. ESL podcast is brought you by eslpod.com at www.eslpod.com. A service of the Center for Educational Development in Los Angeles, California. My name is Jeff McQuillan and lets get started.

Today we're going to talk about family and family members. And in doing so we are going to go over some idioms and expressions related to expressing "likes" and "dislikes". We'll focus on two questions today: "What family member are you most like?" and "What family member are you least like?".


Well, my family member that I think I have the most similarity to or that I resemble the most would be my sister Tris. There are a couple of reasons why I think that we are most similar. Number one: she likes to read and I like to read. We are both readers. We always have lots of books in our house. And we're always reading something. My sister also likes to write. She is a writer by profession and I as a researcher do a lot of writing myself. So we both share an interest in writing. More importantly we are the two members of my family that moved away from where my parents and rest of our family still lives back in the state of Minnesota. We both live here in California. My sister in northern California and I in southern California. I think often in dealing with family members and family tensions and family politics sometimes it's a good idea to move to another part of the country or sometimes even another part of the world as I have done. And break away from those family ties to strike out on our own in order to do something different and that is what both my sister and I did. And I think that's one of the things we have in common.

Now in terms of my siblings that I have the least similarity with or I have the least amount of common interest that would probably be my brother Mike. Now Mike is a big sports fan. He is an avid watcher of television sports. He was an athlete himself. He taught physical education for a few years. So Mike has a lot of interest in sports. He spends a lot of time on things connected with sport both with his own sons as well as his own activities outside of work. I'm not a sports person. I don't really like sports that much. I don't watch sports very often. And so this is one reason why we are not very much alike.

Lets start by talking about these terms: like, alike and likes. In English the word "like" as a verb, you probably already know, means that you interested or you enjoy something. For example: I like to read, I like to go bowling, I like watching television. "Like" is also used as a preposition to mean that you have a similarity or a resemblance with another person or thing. So we might say that Los Angeles is like New York. They are both big cities. Or I'm not like my sister Tris in that she likes to drive and I don't. We use the term "like" here as a way of describing a phrase or expression that has some similarity with something else. Another term that sometimes gets confused but is similar in meaning is "alike". That's A L I K E all one word. "An alike" in this case is usually used as an adjective. For example, my sister and I are alike. This is to express resemblance once again and similarity. Finally there's the term "likes". And likes relates back to that first definite that we gave of the verb "like". "Likes" as a noun means that these are things that you enjoy. So some of my likes are reading, watching television, and surfing the internet. All this would be "likes". And again "likes" serves there is a noun.

Couple of other expressions that you may not have recognised in listening to today's podcast. One was "break away from", I mentioned in talking about how my sister Tris and I are alike. That we sometimes could to break away from your family. "To break away" in this case means "to separate". I also use the expression "to strike out on your own" or "to strike out on my own". This is a difficult term because "strike out" can mean two things. In this case "to strike out on your own" means "to go off on your own", "to be independent", "to separate yourselfs from someone or some group of people". Used alone "strike out" is a baseball term, with you maybe familiar with, which means "to fail at something". And we often use this as a synonym for "failure". For example, I struck out today at work I didn't get a raise.

We come to an end to another English as a Second Language Podcast. My name is Jeff McQuillan. I wanna thank you all for listening today. Remember our podcast reloaded frequently up on a website at www.eslpod.com. This broadcast is copyright 2005 by the Center for Educational Development. Please come back and enjoy us next time at English as a Second Language Podcast. English at the speed of thought.
مدت
00:07:53
زبان
انگلیسی امریکن
موضوع
اصطلاحات
سطح
متوسط
تاریخ
14 خرداد 1399

نظرهای شما

هادی حسین زاده

21 مرداد 1399

Break away : separate
Strike on my own : live independently

هادی حسین زاده

21 مرداد 1399

I like to read a lot.
Reading is like flying in sky.
My likes are reading and walking.
My sister and I are alike.

هادی حسین زاده

21 مرداد 1399

I like to read a lot.
Reading is like flying in sky.
My likes are reading and walking.
My sister and I are alike.